To Live The Childhood

We always think of to go back in time to live the life of our childhood days.

Why do we always feel the present is not a better place, why we always want to live in past.

I think its the new feeling and the new world of our childhood which gives us the excitement to know and to explore the unknown.

We humans are always fond of discoveries and to know the unknown.

See You In The Dream…

How to meet you when you are too far.

How to kiss you when you are just in my heart.

I got so much love for you, that I see you in my dreams.

Dream of your tender smile while holding my hand.

The birds sing for us and the flowers move in joy.

I have Seen magical places with you by my side.

And I cherish the time I have spent with you in my dream.

I love you baby and see you in the dreams…

Tonight Below the Sky…

Tonight below the Sky, I’m counting the stars.

The silence of the night disturbs me, And I forget my count.

The cool wind makes me confuse, and the Meteors distracts my attention.

But still I find myself counting the stars with my fingertip.

I know it is a game and I play until I sleep.

Tonight below the Sky, I’m counting the stars.

Delhi Goes Into Lockdown Tonight, Ends Early Monday Morning

New Delhi: 

Delhi will go into a six-day lockdown from 10 pm tonight to 5 am next Monday, Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal announced today, calling it necessary with the city’s resources at a breaking point in an escalating Covid crisis. Only essential services will be allowed.

“If we don’t impose a lockdown now, we might face a bigger calamity. The government will take full care of you. We took this tough decision taking the situation into consideration,” Arvind Kejriwal said.

“The six-day lockdown will help us arrange more beds and supplies.”

Mr Kejriwal said ICU beds were almost over and oxygen levels were critically low in the city. He shared that one private hospital had run out of oxygen at 3 am on Saturday, which could have turned into a disaster.

“We are not trying to scare you…I won’t say the health system has collapsed but it is really stressed. There are limits to any system,” said the Chief Minister.

He appealed to migrant workers not to leave Delhi during what he called a “small lockdown”.

All private offices will go back to Work From Home mode and only government offices and essential services will be open.

Grocers, shops selling food and medicine and newspaper sellers will function. Banks, ATMs, insurance offices will operate. Home deliveries and takeaways will also be allowed.

India this morning reported a record high of 273,810 infections, the fifth consecutive day of more than 200,000 cases.

Delhi is the worst hit city. On Sunday, Delhi recorded the biggest jump in Covid cases — 25,462 — and a positivity rate of nearly 30 per cent, which means almost every third sample being tested in the city is turning out positive. A day before, 24,375 Covid cases and 167 deaths were reported in the city. Today, the cases dipped to a little over 23,000 but the situation remains grim with the city reaching what Mr Kejriwal said could be a tipping point.

A weekend curfew was earlier enforced in Delhi to “break the chain of transmission”. Continuing violations in parts of the city in the past two days also signaled that harsher steps were needed, officials said.

Mr Kejriwal met with Lieutenant Governor Anil Baijal before announcing the lockdown.

Delhi will go into a six-day lockdown from 10 pm tonight to 5 am next Monday, Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal announced today, calling it necessary with the city’s resources at a breaking point in an escalating Covid crisis. Only essential services will be allowed.

“If we don’t impose a lockdown now, we might face a bigger calamity. The government will take full care of you. We took this tough decision taking the situation into consideration,” Arvind Kejriwal said.

“The six-day lockdown will help us arrange more beds and supplies.”

Mr Kejriwal said ICU beds were almost over and oxygen levels were critically low in the city. He shared that one private hospital had run out of oxygen at 3 am on Saturday, which could have turned into a disaster.

“We are not trying to scare you…I won’t say the health system has collapsed but it is really stressed. There are limits to any system,” said the Chief Minister.

He appealed to migrant workers not to leave Delhi during what he called a “small lockdown”.

All private offices will go back to Work From Home mode and only government offices and essential services will be open.

Grocers, shops selling food and medicine and newspaper sellers will function. Banks, ATMs, insurance offices will operate. Home deliveries and takeaways will also be allowed.

India this morning reported a record high of 273,810 infections, the fifth consecutive day of more than 200,000 cases.

Delhi is the worst hit city. On Sunday, Delhi recorded the biggest jump in Covid cases — 25,462 — and a positivity rate of nearly 30 per cent, which means almost every third sample being tested in the city is turning out positive. A day before, 24,375 Covid cases and 167 deaths were reported in the city. Today, the cases dipped to a little over 23,000 but the situation remains grim with the city reaching what Mr Kejriwal said could be a tipping point.

A weekend curfew was earlier enforced in Delhi to “break the chain of transmission”. Continuing violations in parts of the city in the past two days also signaled that harsher steps were needed, officials said.

Mr Kejriwal met with Lieutenant Governor Anil Baijal before announcing the lockdown.

In the earlier order, auditoriums, restaurants, malls, gyms and spas were shut down in Delhi and movie theatres are allowed only with a third of their capacity. All gatherings — social, religious or political – were banned. Weddings were limited to 50 participants and funerals, 20. Wedding guests need to show their invitation cards. Those instructions stand.

Mr Kejriwal said migrant workers would be taken care of and should not leave the city, like the previous lockdown when thousands left with their families and belongings for their hometowns, after losing their jobs and homes overnight. “With folded hands, I request you to not leave the city, this is a small lockdown of six days, these days will be wasted in your travel journey only, stay here. The government will take care of you, I am here, believe me,” the Chief Minister said.

Low to medium risk of Russian invasion of Ukraine in next few weeks: US general

There is a “low to medium” risk that Russia will invade Ukraine over the next few weeks, the top U.S. general in Europe said on Thursday, in the first such military assessment amid mounting concern about Russian troop movements toward Ukraine’s borders.

Air Force General Tod Wolters declined to explain the intelligence driving his assessment, which does not suggest that the U.S. military expects a Russian invasion at this point, but he is not ruling one out or playing down the risk.

But, in testimony before a House of Representatives committee he later suggested his view about the risks in the coming weeks and months was at least partly based on the disposition of Russian forces.

The Pentagon has declined to detail its assessment on the size and composition of those troops, referring reporters to Moscow. However, the White House disclosed last week that Russia had more troops on Ukraine’s eastern border than at any time since 2014, when it annexed Crimea and backed separatist territory seizures.

Asked by a lawmaker on the Armed Services Committee to estimate the chances of an invasion in the next few weeks, Wolters said: “Low to medium.”

Pressed by another lawmaker to explain whether that risk would change after that period, Wolters kept his cards close, saying: “The answer is, it depends.”

“And I would have to take each and every second of the day from this point till tomorrow to give you a different answer,” said Wolters, who is both head of the U.S. military’s European Command and is NATO’s supreme allied commander Europe.

If the current trajectory stayed the same, however, Wolters estimated the risk of an invasion could decrease.

“My sense is, with the trend that I see right now, that the likelihood of an occurrence will start to wane,” he told Congress members.

Ukraine and Russia have traded blame over a spike in violence in the conflict in eastern Ukraine, where Ukrainian troops have battled Russian-backed separatist forces in a conflict that Kyiv says has killed 14,000 people since 2014.

Tensions over a buildup of Russian troops on Ukraine’s eastern border have pushed up the cost of raising domestic debt and prompted the government to accelerate efforts to secure more International Monetary Fund loans, an adviser to Ukraine’s president told Reuters on Thursday.

The United States sought to impose costs on Russia on Thursday by imposing a broad array of sanctions, including curbs to its sovereign debt market, to punish it for interfering in last year’s U.S. presidential election, cyber-hacking, bullying Ukraine and other alleged “malign” actions.

Laura Cooper, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia, pointed to the sanctions and described the conflict in eastern Ukraine as “a hot war right now.”

“Since January, we’ve already had 30 Ukrainian service members killed in the east,” Cooper testified, speaking alongside Wolters.

Still, both Cooper and Walters did not request additional authorities to support Ukrainian forces, which started receiving anti-tank weapons and other weaponry in recent years from Washington.

“I think we have the right authorities and we have been able to provide the right lethal assistance, again, both on the land domain and the maritime domain at this point,” Cooper said.

“Need To Do Better Job For Employees”: Jeff Bezos In Last Letter As CEO

San Francisco, United States: 

US tech giant Amazon on Thursday sounded conciliatory notes as the US government considers stricter regulatory measures against America’s largest digital platforms.

Founder Jeff Bezos told investors his e-commerce empire needs a better “vision” for its workers, just days after an effort to create the company’s first labor union was defeated.

Some Amazon executives had fired off snappy comments at various politicians who supported the labor campaign, but their chief executive took a more circumspect approach to the anti-union victory at its plant in Bessemer, Alabama.

“Does your chair take comfort in the outcome of the recent union vote in Bessemer?” Bezos asked rhetorically in an annual letter to shareholders.

“No, he doesn’t. I think we need to do a better job for our employees.”

In the letter, which was his final before stepping down as chief executive, Bezos laid out a new goal for the company to be “Earth’s best employer and Earth’s safest place to work.”

“Despite what we’ve accomplished, it’s clear to me that we need a better vision for our employees’ success,” Bezos said.

The vote count in the contentious unionization drive at the warehouse in the southern state of Alabama last week showed a wide majority of workers rejecting the move.

“Bezos’s admission today demonstrates that what we have been saying about workplace conditions is correct,” said Stuart Appelbaum, president of the union that vied to represent Amazon workers.

“But his admission won’t change anything, workers need a union — not just another Amazon public relations effort in damage control.”

Bezos rejected news reports that he said unfairly portray Amazon workers as “desperate souls and treated as robots.”

“That’s not accurate,” Bezos said.

“They’re sophisticated and thoughtful people who have options for where to work.”

Unions and political leaders have argued that Amazon employees face constant pressure and monitoring, with little job protection, highlighting the need for collective bargaining.

Amazon has held firm that most of its workers don’t want or need a union and that the company already provides more than most other employers, with a minimum $15 hourly wage and other benefits.

Tax boost backed

Bezos had already shown deference to political momentum, announcing support for an increase in corporate taxes sought by US President Joe Biden to help finance a $2 trillion infrastructure plan.

Bezos embraced the move just days after Biden singled out Amazon for avoiding federal income taxes while proposing to boost the corporate tax rate to 28 percent.

“We support the Biden administration’s focus on making bold investments in American infrastructure,” Bezos said.

“We recognize this investment will require concessions from all sides — both on the specifics of what’s included as well as how it gets paid for (we’re supportive of a rise in the corporate tax rate).”

Amazon has been the target of critics for years who claim it pays little or no corporate taxes. The company has defended its policies, saying that its investments offset taxes as intended by the tax code.

Last month, Biden cited a 2019 study showing 91 Fortune 500 companies, “the biggest companies in the world, including Amazon… pay not a single, solitary penny of federal income tax,” adding, “that is just wrong.”

Bezos’s support for raising corporate taxes was echoed Thursday by the Chamber of Progress, a self-described “center-left” tech industry coalition whose roster of members includes Amazon, Facebook, Google and Twitter.

“Many tech industry leaders view corporate taxes as a patriotic duty and a wise investment in a well-functioning society,” chamber chief Adam Kovacevich said in message posted online.

“President Biden’s proposal to raise corporate tax rates to make major investments in infrastructure is a tradeoff that many in the tech industry can support.”

Meanwhile, political will to regulate internet giants whose power has grown dramatically during the pandemic has seemed to increase.

US House Antitrust Subcommittee Chairman David Cicilline said Thursday that a 16-month investigation makes it clear that Congress must act.

“Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook each hold monopoly power over significant sectors of our economy,” Cicilline said in a statement.